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Monoclonal antibody treatment

Allina Health is offering monoclonal antibody infusion therapy to eligible individuals.

Monoclonal antibody infusion therapy is used to treat a person who has COVID-19.

Eligibility criteria

The current eligibility criteria for bebtelovimab (monoclonal antibody) treatment at Allina Health is that you:

  • are age 18 or older
  • have tested positive for COVID-19 (RT-PCR nasopharyngeal swab or antigen test)
  • have mild to moderate symptoms (You are not in the hospital and you do not need oxygen.)
  • must be able to have the infusion within seven days of when your symptoms started
  • have at least one risk factor for severe COVID-19

Not eligible

You are ineligible (not able to have this treatment at Allina Health) if you meet one of these criteria:

  • are younger than age 18
  • have been admitted to the hospital for COVID-19
  • need post-exposure prophylaxis (This treatment is not authorized by the FDA to be used to prevent COVID-19.)

If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, please talk with your health care provider about if this treatment is right for you.

How do you get monoclonal antibody infusion therapy?

Schedule a virtual or in-person visit with your primary care provider as soon as you have any symptoms to determine if you are eligible for this treatment.

If you are eligible, your primary care provider will add your information to the contact list to receive this treatment. You will receive a phone call if there is a dose available for you.

If Allina Health has not called you within 2 business days of being added to the list, you will not receive this treatment at Allina Health. 

Monoclonal antibody infusion therapy frequently asked questions

Antibodies are proteins that your body makes to help fight off an illness. They can also provide immunity (protection from disease). Monoclonal antibodies are made in a lab and are similar to the antibodies your body makes.

Monoclonal antibody infusion therapy is used to treat a person who has COVID-19. The medicine used is called bebtelovimab.

Bebtelovimab is an “investigational” medicine. This means it is still being studied and not all of the risks are known at this time. Early research has shown that this medicine is safe and can reduce your risk of being admitted to the hospital.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved bebtelovimab for emergency use. This means it has met certain criteria (safety, performance and labeling) to be used when there are no other medicines available.

This treatment is given by infusion therapy. You receive the medicine through an intravenous (IV) catheter (thin tube) inserted into a vein in your arm.

The injection takes about 1 minute to be given. You will then be watched closely for any side effects for 1 hour.

This treatment is only for people at increased risk of serious illness due to their age or health history. People with certain risk factors can have a more severe case of COVID-19.

To have this treatment, you need to:

  • have tested positive for COVID-19
  • have at least one risk factor for severe COVID-19
  • have mild or moderate symptoms and do not need oxygen
  • not be in the hospital
  • have the infusion within 7 days of when your symptoms start
  • be age 12 or older
  • weigh at least 88 pounds

If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, please talk with your health care provider about if this treatment is right for you.

Schedule a virtual or in-person visit with your primary care provider as soon as you have any symptoms to determine if you are eligible for this treatment.

If you are eligible, your primary care provider will add your information to the contact list to receive this treatment. You will receive a phone call if there is a dose available for you.

If Allina Health has not called you within 2 business days of being added to the list, you will not receive this treatment at Allina Health.

Before having monoclonal antibody infusion therapy, it is important to tell your health care provider if you:

  • have a serious illness
  • have any allergies
  • are taking any medicines (including all prescription, over-the-counter, vitamins, herbal or natural products)
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant

Monoclonal antibody infusion therapy will help:

  • keep you feeling well
  • lower your risk of getting worse from COVID-19 or being admitted to the hospital
  • shorten the length of time your symptoms last

Monoclonal antibody infusion therapy could cause side effects, which can differ from person to person. They are still being studied and there could be other side effects that have not been reported.

Common side effects include:

  • nausea (upset stomach)
  • vomiting (throwing up)
  • diarrhea
  • headache
  • dizziness or lightheadedness
  • itching

At the infusion site, you may have pain, bleeding, bruising, soreness, swelling and possible infection.

Tell your health care provider right away if you have any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

Some serious side effects such as an allergic reaction are possible, but not as common. Symptoms of an allergic reaction include fever, chills, nausea, headache, shortness of breath, low blood pressure, wheezing, swelling of your lips, face, or throat, rash including hives, itching, muscle aches, and dizziness.

If you have an allergic reaction, call 911 or have someone drive you to the Emergency Department right away. Be sure to tell medical staff that you have tested positive for COVID-19. After you have received care, tell your health care provider about your side effects.

Your insurance provider will be billed for part of the treatment (giving you the medicine). Call your insurance provider to see how much you will need to pay. If you do not have insurance or have any questions, talk with your health care provider.