Health Guide
Drug Guide

Cannabis

What is it?

Cannabis is an herbal medicine used to treat nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy medicine. It is also used to decrease eye pressure, decrease pain, and to improve the appetite. Other uses for cannabis may include headaches, anxiety, asthma, Tourette syndrome, and to relax muscles.

Other names for cannabis include: Cannabis sativa, Hashish, Hemp, and Marijuana.

Ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist if you need more information about this medicine or if any information in this leaflet concerns you.

Before Using:

Tell your doctor if you .

Dosage:

Talk with your caregiver about how much cannabis you should take. The amount depends on the strength of the medicine and the reason you are taking cannabis. If you are using this medicine without instructions from your caregiver, follow the directions on the medicine bottle. Do not take more medicine or take it more often than the directions tell you to.

To store this medicine:

Keep all medicine locked up and away from children. Store medicine away from heat and direct light. Do not store your medicine in the bathroom, near the kitchen sink, or in other damp places. Heat or moisture may cause the medicine to break down and not work the way it should work. Throw away medicine that is out of date or that you do not need. Never share your medicine with others.

Drug and Food Interactions:

Do not take Cannabis without talking to your doctor first if you are taking:

Warnings:

Side Effects:

Call your doctor right away if you have any of these side effects:

Other Side Effects:

You may have the following side effects, but this medicine may also cause other side effects. Tell your doctor if you have side effects that you think are caused by this medicine.

References:

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3. Product Information: Norvir(TM), ritonavir. Abbott Laboratories, Chicago, IL; 1996.

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6. Product Information: Marinol(R), dronabinol. Roxane Laboratories, Columbus, OH; 1999.

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18. Lukas SE & Oroczo S: Ethanol increases plasma delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) levels and subjective effects after marijuana smoking in human volunteers. Drug Alcohol Depend 2001; 64(2):143-149.

19. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: Marijuana and alcohol combined severely impede driving performance. Ann Emerg Med 2000; 35(4):398-399.

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34. Product Information: Marinol(R), dronabinol. Roxane Laboratories, Columbus, OH, 1999.

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37. Herman TS, Einhorn LE, Jones SE et al: Superiority of nabilone over prochlorperazine as an antiemetic in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. N Engl J Med 1979; 300:1295-1297.

38. Mathew RJ, Wilson WH, Humphreys DF et al: Middle cerebral artery velocity during upright posture after marijuana smoking. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1992; 86:173-178.

39. Jusko WJ, Gardner MJ, Mangione A et al: Factors affecting theophylline clearances: age, tobacco, marijuana, cirrhosis, congestive heart failure, obesity, oral contraceptives, benzodiazepines, barbiturates and ethanol. J Pharm Sci 1979; 68:1358-1366.

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41. Hillard JR & Vieweg WV: Marked sinus tachycardia resulting from the synergistic effects of marijuana and nortriptyline. Am J Psychiatry 1983; 140:626-627.

42. Yamreudeewong W, Wong HK, Brausch LM, et al: Probable interaction between warfarin and marijuana smoking. Ann Pharmacother 2009; 43(7):1347-1353.


Last Updated: 9/15/2016

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