Health Guide
Drug Guide

Queen's delight

What is it?

Queen's delight is an herbal medicine used to treat skin conditions, hemorrhoids, constipation (not able to have a bowel movement), and cough.

Other names for Queen's Delight include: Queen's Root, Stillingia, Stillingia treculeana, Johnst, and Yaw Root.

Ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist if you need more information about this medicine or if any information in this leaflet concerns you.

Before Using:

Tell your doctor if you

Dosage:

Talk with your caregiver about how much Queen's Delight you should take. The amount depends on the strength of the medicine and the reason you are taking Queen's Delight. If you are using this medicine without instructions from your caregiver, follow the directions on the medicine bottle. Do not take more medicine or take it more often than the directions tell you to.

To store this medicine:

Keep all medicine locked up and away from children. Store medicine away from heat and direct light. Do not store your medicine in the bathroom, near the kitchen sink, or in other damp places. Heat or moisture may cause the medicine to break down and not work the way it should work. Throw away medicine that is out of date or that you do not need. Never share your medicine with others.

Warnings:

Side Effects:

Stop taking your medicine right away and talk to your doctor if you have any of the following side effects. Your medicine may be causing these symptoms which may mean you are allergic to it.

Other Side Effects:

You may have the following side effects, but this medicine may also cause other side effects. Tell your doctor if you have side effects that you think are caused by this medicine.

References:

1.Anon: British Herbal Pharmacopoeia. British Herbal Medicine Association, Keighley, UK; 1983.

2. Wren RC: Potter's New Cyclopedia of botanical drugs and Preparations. Saffron Walden, Daniel, UK; 1988.

3. Mills SY: The Dictionary of Modern Herbalism. Thorsons, Wellingborough, UK; 1985.

4. Frohne D & Pfander HJ: A Colour Atlas of Poisonous Plants. Wolfe Pub, London, UK; 1984.

5. Adolf W & Hecker E: New irritant diterpene-esters from roots of Stillingia sylvatica L. (Euphorbiaceae). Tetrahedron Lett 1980; 21:2887-2890.

6. McGuffin M, Hobbs C, Upton R et al (eds). American Herbal Product's Association's Botanical Safety Handbook: guidelines for the safe use and labeling for herbs in commerce. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL; 1997.


Last Updated: 9/15/2016

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