Health Guide
Drug Guide

Myrrh

What is it?

Myrrh is an herbal medicine used to treat ulcers, sore throat, skin wounds, high blood sugar, high cholesterol, upset stomach and gas, and gingivitis (gum soreness and swelling).

Other names for Myrrh include: Commiphora Molmol, African Myrrh, Balsamodendron Myrrh, Commiphora Myrrha, and Somali Myrrh.

Ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist if you need more information about this medicine or if any information in this leaflet concerns you.

Before Using:

Tell your doctor if you

Dosage:

Talk with your caregiver about how much Myrrh you should take. The amount depends on the strength of the medicine and the reason you are taking Myrrh. If you are using this medicine without instructions from your caregiver, follow the directions on the medicine bottle. Do not take more medicine or take it more often than the directions tell you to.

To store this medicine:

Keep all medicine locked up and away from children. Store medicine away from heat and direct light. Do not store your medicine in the bathroom, near the kitchen sink, or in other damp places. Heat or moisture may cause the medicine to break down and not work the way it should work. Throw away medicine that is out of date or that you do not need. Never share your medicine with others.

Warnings:

Side Effects:

Stop taking your medicine right away and talk to your doctor if you have any of the following side effects. Your medicine may be causing these symptoms which may mean you are allergic to it.

Other Side Effects:

You may have the following side effects, but this medicine may also cause other side effects. Tell your doctor if you have side effects that you think are caused by this medicine.

References:

1. Bradley PR (ed.): British Herbal Compendium vol, 1. British Herbal Medicine Association, Bournemouth, UK; 1992.

2. Anon: British Herbal Pharmacopoeia. British Herbal Medicine Association, Keighley, UK; 1983.

3. Al-Awadi FM et al: Studies on the activity of individual plants of an antidiabetic plant mixture. Acta Diabetol Lat 1987; 24:37-41.

4. Al-Awadi FM et al: On the mechanism of the hypoglycemic effect of a plant extract. Diabetologia 1985; 28:432-434.

5. Leung AY: Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Food, Drugs, and Biologicals, 11th edition. Merck, Rahway, NJ; 1989.

6. McGuffin M, Hobbs C, Upton R et al (eds): American Herbal Products Association's Botanical Safety Handbook: guidelines for the safe use and labeling for herbs in commerce. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL; 1997.

7. Brinker F. Herb Contraindications and Drug Interactions. Eclectic Institute Inc, Sandy, OR; 1997.

8. Malhotra SC & Ahuja MMS: Comparative hypolipidaemic effectiveness of gum guggulu (Commiphora mukul) fraction 'A', ethyl-p-chlorophenoxyisobutyrate and Ciba-13437-Su. Indian J Med Res 1971; 59:1621-1632.

9. Fetrow CW & Avila JR: Professional's Handbook of Complementary and Alternative Medicines. Springhouse Corporation, Springhouse, PA; 1999: 448-450.


Last Updated: 9/15/2016

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