Health Guide
Drug Guide

Cranberry

What is it?

Cranberry is an herbal medicine used to prevent and treat urinary tract infections and kidney stones.

Other names for cranberry include: American cranberry, bear berry, black cranberry, and low cranberry.

Ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist if you need more information about this medicine or if any information in this leaflet concerns you.

Before Using:

Tell your doctor if you

Dosage:

Talk with your caregiver about how much cranberry you should take. The amount depends on the strength of the medicine and the reason you are taking Cranberry. If you are using this medicine without instructions from your caregiver, follow the directions on the medicine bottle. Do not take more medicine or take it more often than the directions tell you to.

To store this medicine:

Keep all medicine locked up and away from children. Store medicine away from heat and direct light. Do not store your medicine in the bathroom, near the kitchen sink, or in other damp places. Heat or moisture may cause the medicine to break down and not work the way it should work. Throw away medicine that is out of date or that you do not need. Never share your medicine with others.

Drug and Food Interactions:

Do not take cranberry without talking to your doctor first if you are taking:

Warnings:

Side Effects:

Call your doctor right away if you have any of these side effects:

Other Side Effects:

This medicine may also cause other side effects. Tell your doctor if you have side effects that you think are caused by this medicine.

References:

1. Hughes B & Lawson L: Nutritional content of cranberry products. Am J Hosp Pharm 1989; 46:1129.

2. Saltzman JR, Kemp JA, Golner BB et al: Effect of hypochlorhydria due to omeprazole treatment or atrophic gastritis on protein-bound vitamin B12 absorption. J Am Coll Nutr 1994;13(6):584-591.

3. Terris MK, Issa MM & Tacker R: Dietary supplementation with cranberry concentrate tablets may increase the risk of nephrolithiasis. Urology 2001; 57(1):26-29.

4. Walker EB, Barney DP, Mickelsen JN et al: Cranberry concentrate: UTI prophylaxis (letter). J Fam Pract 1997; 45:167-169.

5. Suvarna R, Pirmohamed M & Henderson L: Possible interaction between warfarin and cranberry juice. Br Med J 2003; 327:1454.

6. Paeng CH, Sprague M, & Jackevicius CA: Interaction between warfarin and cranberry juice. Clin Ther 2007; 29(8):1730-1735.

7. Committee on Safety of Medicines: Possible interaction between warfarin and cranberry juice. Curr Prob Pharmacovigilance 2003; 29(8):8-8.

8. Grant P: Warfarin and cranberry juice: an interaction?. J Heart Valve Dis 2004; 13(1):25-26.

9. Product Information: COUMADIN(R) intravenous powder for solution, oral tablet, warfarin sodium intravenous powder for solution, oral tablet. Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ, 2005.


Last Updated: 12/4/2008

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