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Why do we only get flu in the winter?

[WCCO TV, Oct. 30, 2013] Why does it seem we only get the flu in cold weather months? That’s the Good Question that WCCO’s Heather Brown put to Dr. Frank Rhame, an Allina Medical Clinic infectious disease specialist. Watch the answer here.

What if it’s not the flu?

[KMSP Fox 9 News, Oct. 22, 2013] Sue Johnson thought she had the flu 8 months ago. Like many people, she decided to ride it out at home—especially since influenza is so contagious that’s what a doctor would encourage.

It turned out, though, it wasn’t the flu. It was a kidney stone that caused an infection, sent her into septic shock and lead to the amputation her legs and hands.

So with flu season upon us, how can a person tell if the symptoms match up?

“Usually, there is a clue in what’s going on that will tell you if you have to do something or not,” assured Dr. Frank Rhame, with Allina Medical Clinic. Watch the full report here.

It’s time for your flu shot

[KMSP Fox 9 News, September 30, 2013] October 1 is usually thought of as the start of the flu season. That means if you haven’t got your flu vaccine shot already, you should be thinking about getting it soon.

Allina Medical Clinic infectious disease specialist, Dr. Wendolyn Slattery talked with Fox 9 News about what’s in this year’s shot and different ways you can get it.

Is September The Time For Flu Shots?

[WCCO-TV, September 16, 2013] It seems a far cry from those dreary winter days when the flu bug is biting, but under September’s sunshine, the influenza season is on the minds of many as they walk down Nicollet Mall.

Karen Duerr was quick to point out Monday that she has already received her flu shot. “It was convenient,” she said. “I was at the doctor’s office, and I thought I’d get it done while I was there.”

She’s not alone. At Mercy Hospital in Coon Rapids, hundreds of health care workers were rolling up their sleeves and breathing in. Some got the vaccine in the form of a flu mist through their nose, while others opted for the more conventional shot in the upper arm.

New vaccine covers four strains of the flu

[KARE11, September 2, 2013] Last year was a severe flu season that sickened millions and cleared out drug aisles everywhere.

This year researchers have developed a new vaccination that covers four flu strains rather three. The vaccine, called Quadrivalent, protects two strains of type A influenza like last year’s strain of H3N2 and now two strains from type B.

Dr. Ayesha Rashid at United Hospital, part of Allina Health, says it's too early to tell if this vaccination will provide the best protection. But researchers wanted to be prepared. Watch the story here.


Source: Allina News
Reviewed by: Allina News
First Published: 09/02/2013
Last Reviewed: 11/04/2013