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Diabetes

Having diabetes puts you at an increased risk for heart problems because of the disease's effect on your blood vessels.

Did you know?

More than 65 percent of people who have diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Adults who have diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease than adults who do not have diabetes.

(Sources: National Diabetes Education Program and the American Diabetes Association)

When diabetes is not under control, a build-up of glucose in your blood leads to an increase in triglycerides, which can lead to peripheral artery disease (PAD).

Adults who have diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease or suffer a stroke than people who do not have diabetes.

About 65 percent of people who have diabetes die from heart disease or stroke, according to the National Diabetes Education Program.

Warning

If you have diabetes, do not smoke. Smoking doubles your risk for heart disease.

(Source: National Diabetes Education Program)

Diabetes is a stronger heart disease risk factor for women than it is for men.

Diabetes is a lifelong disease that cannot be cured, but it can be managed.

To reduce your risk for heart disease and stroke, control your glucose and lipid levels, manage your blood pressure, get regular exercise, control your weight, watch your diet and do not smoke.

Work with your health care team to keep your fasting blood glucose below 120 mg/dL and your hemoglobin A1c below 7 percent.


 

 

Source: Allina Health's Patient Education Department, Helping Your Heart, fourth edition, cvs-ahc-90648

First published: 10/04/2002
Last updated: 06/01/2007

Reviewed by: Allina Health's Patient Education Department experts