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Mental health services: Depression

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Depression symptoms

Symptoms of depression

Depression symptoms, how severe they are, and how long they last, will vary among people. Symptoms can include:

  • sad, anxious or "empty" feelings
  • feeling hopeless and/or negative
  • feeling guilty, worthless and/or helpless
  • feeling irritable or restless
  • losing interest in activities or hobbies you once enjoyed (including sex)
  • feeling tired or having less energy than normal
  • having trouble concentrating, remembering details or making decisions
  • trouble falling asleep, waking up early, or sleeping too much
  • changes in appetite and weight
  • having thoughts of suicide or suicide attempts
  • having aches and pains, headaches, cramps or digestive problems that do not go away with treatment.
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Suicide and suicidal behavior

Suicide is the act of taking one's own life on purpose. Suicidal behavior is any action that could cause a person to die.

Learn more about suicide and suicidal behavior in our health library.

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Depression

Depression may be described as feeling sad, blue, unhappy, miserable, or down in the dumps. Most of us feel this way at one time or another for short periods.

Clinical depression is a mood disorder in which feelings of sadness, loss, anger, or frustration interfere with everyday life for a longer period of time.

Learn more about depression in our health library.


Source: Allina Health Patient Education, Depression Workbook, mh-ahc-94394
Reviewed by: Allina Health Patient Education
First Published: 01/01/2011
Last Reviewed: 01/01/2011

Risk factors for depression

Any of the following can increase your risk for depression:

  • death of a loved one
  • divorce
  • job change
  • giving birth
  • moving
  • perceived stress of any kind
  • major illness, such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases
  • drug or alcohol abuse
  • prescription medicine side effect
  • family history of depression
  • changes in hormones.
close icon
Depression

Depression may be described as feeling sad, blue, unhappy, miserable, or down in the dumps. Most of us feel this way at one time or another for short periods.

Clinical depression is a mood disorder in which feelings of sadness, loss, anger, or frustration interfere with everyday life for a longer period of time.

Learn more about depression in our health library.


Source: Allina Patient Education, Depression Workbook, mh-ahc-94394
Reviewed by: Allina Patient Education
First Published: 01/01/2011
Last Reviewed: 01/01/2011

Suicide awareness and prevention

Some people who have mental and physical health problems may consider suicide. No one can predict suicide, but it is possible to identify people who may be at an increased risk.

People at risk for suicide include those who:

  • have had previous suicide attempts
  • have guns in their homes
  • abuse alcohol, prescription medicines or illegal drugs
  • have a mental illness (such as bipolar disorder, major depression or schizophrenia)
  • have a history of violence or abuse
  • have had a sudden, major loss or a stressful situation such as a divorce, death, financial crisis, school or job pressures
  • have a family history of mental illness, alcoholism or substance abuse
  • have recently had a hospital stay for depression or other mental health reasons.

If you are feeling suicidal,
call 911 for help right away or go to the nearest emergency room. Call a crisis line or someone who can provide support.

close icon
Suicide and suicidal behavior

Suicide is the act of taking one's own life on purpose. Suicidal behavior is any action that could cause a person to die.

Learn more about suicide and suicidal behavior in our health library.


Source: Allina Patient Education, Depression Workbook, mh-ahc-94394 (1/11)
Reviewed by: Allina Patient Education
First Published: 01/01/2011
Last Reviewed: 01/01/2011