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Abbott Northwestern Hospital

Heart Rhythm Management (Electrophysiology) Program

A program of:


William Katsiyiannis, MD

Heart rhythm problems (also called irregular heartbeat or arrhythmia) are the result of abnormal electrical impulses that cause the heart to beat too quickly, too slowly or irregularly. Learn more about the many types of arrhythmias.

Minneapolis Heart Institute at Abbott Northwestern Hospital offers several options for diagnosing and treating heart rhythm issues.

Consider a referral to the Genetic Arrhythmia Center if:

  • Your family medical history includes sudden death before age 40, or
  • You experience fainting episodes during or after physical activity or due to emotional excitement or distress.

Ask your primary care provider for a referral.

There are several options available to treat heart rhythm problems. First, patients must undergo testing to determine the type of arrhythmia. Then, a physician will guide a treatment plan based on symptoms, patient age and other factors.

Tests

Electrophysiology study (EPS)

An electrophysiology study (EPS) is a detailed study of the heart's electrical system and is done to investigate an abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia).

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Abnormal heart rhythm

Arrhythmia or dysrhythmia is an irregular heartbeat or rhythm. This can happen when your heart has extra beats, when it beats too fast or too slow.

Learn more about problems with the rhythm of your heart in our Helping Your Heart manual.

Treatments

Cardioversion

Normal heart rhythm is restored using a defibrillator (electric cardioversion) or medications (pharmacologic cardioversion).

Catheter Ablation

A special catheter is used to deliver high-frequency energy to destroy a tiny portion of the problem heart tissue from the area of arrhythmia.

Pacemaker

This permanent therapy may be required if your heart has a problem conducting impulses from the upper to lower chambers.

Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD)

This device automatically monitors your heart rhythm and delivers a shock to restore the heart to a normal rhythm when an abnormality is detected.


Source: Allina Patient Education, Helping Your Heart, fourth edition, cvs-ahc-90648; Allina Patient Education, Electrophysiology Study (EPS), cvs-ahc-11798
Reviewed by: Allina Patient Education experts
First Published: 10/04/2002
Last Reviewed: 09/21/2011

Patients who need pacemakers or implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are enrolled in a follow-up surveillance program.

Generally, patients can expect to have their new device evaluated two months after implantation and then every three to four months thereafter. The Pacemaker and ICD Follow Up Clinic Program is offered at several locations throughout Minnesota.

Pacemaker and ICD Follow Up Clinic Program locations:

In addition to clinic visits, follow up by telephone is also used to monitor the functionality of the device.


Source: Allina Patient Education, Helping Your Heart, fourth edition, cvs-ahc-90648
Reviewed by: Allina Patient Education experts
First Published: 10/04/2002
Last Reviewed: 06/01/2007

Providers

 

Our Heart Rhythm Management team offers a full range of cardiac electrophysiology services.

Charles C Gornick, MD
Director of Electrophysiology

Raed Husam Abdelhadi, MD
Co-director of Genetic Arrhythmia Clinic

William Katsiyiannis, MD
Co-director of Genetic Arrhythmia Clinic

Daniel Melby, MD
Director of Electrophysiology Lab

Jay Sengupta, MD
Heart Rhythm Management Team

Chuen Tang, MD
Co-Director of Cardiac Device Clinic

Elizabeth Hoffman, PA-C

Elizabeth Hunt, NP-C

Tamara Langeberg, NP-C

Christy Maxfield, NP-C

Terry Trippler had a heart problem so he went to Minneapolis Heart Institute at Abbott Northwestern to see Dr. Katsiyiannis for an Ablation procedure.

Click on the video below to hear his success story.