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Beginnings: Pregnancy, Birth & Beyond

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Breastfeeding quiz

Do you know the truth about breastfeeding? Take this quiz when you begin to consider infant feeding options in early pregnancy and find out.

1. Formula-fed babies are healthier because formula is sterile and chemically balanced.

True

False


2. Breastfeeding benefits the mother and speeds postpartum recovery.

True

False


3. Breastfed newborns should be given bottles of water or formula until the mother's milk comes in.

True

False


4. Nursing less than 5 minutes at a time helps prevent sore nipples.

True

False


5. All breastfeeding mothers have sore nipples at first.

True

False


6. To maintain a schedule, a breastfed baby should only be fed every 3 hours.

True

False


7. Breastfed babies should be weaned when the first teeth appear.

True

False


8. If a breastfeeding mother gets a cold or the flu, she should stop breastfeeding.

True

False


Answers

1. False. Breastfed babies are healthier. Breast milk contains antibodies that help fight disease.

2. True. Breastfeeding helps the mother's uterus return to its nonpregnant size. It also decreases postpartum bleeding.

3. False. Breastfed babies do not need water. They need to nurse and get colostrum, the first milk. Frequent nursing will help develop the mother's milk supply.

4. False. Poor positioning causes sore nipples. Breastfed babies should nurse 10 to 20 minutes per breast. Nursing for less time can decrease milk production. In addition, the baby will still be hungry and may lose weight.

5. False. Many breastfeeding mothers never have sore nipples. There are ways that sore nipples can be prevented.

6. False. Breastfed babies should be fed on demand. In general, newborns feed every 1 to 3 hours. Breastfed babies should not be kept on a feeding schedule.

7. False. Babies can be breastfed for 3 to 4 years. Many babies wean themselves by one year of age.

8. False. Breast milk contains antibodies and will not spread common viruses. A mother should wash her hands before nursing to prevent spreading germs.


 

Source: Allina Health's Patient Education Department, Beginnings: Pregnancy, Birth and Beyond, sixth edition, preg-ahc-90026, ISBN 1-931876-25-8

First published: 11/14/2002
Last updated: 08/22/2011

Reviewed by: Angela Christian, RN, perinatal education coordinator, St. Francis Regional Medical Center; Cynthia Fredrickson, coordinator of parent education, Abbott Northwestern Hospital; Cheryl Kirchner, RN, care center leader, United Hospital Birth Center; and Janice Kugler, RNC, parent/family education coordinator, Unity Hospital