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Basic Skills for Living with Diabetes

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Diabetes health tip

Diabetes: Sorting fact from fiction
Diabetes is a serious illness. To help contain this leading cause of disability and death, it’s important to separate fact from fiction.


More diabetes health tips...


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Making changes because of diabetes

You may be fired up to make changes in your life now that you have diabetes. You may also feel upset or have other emotions. It is important to start slowly.

Changing habits is hard

The changes you make will need to be small and realistic so you can be successful. Start by looking at what changes you need to make in your life. Decide what changes you are ready to work on now. It is important to be ready to make changes at your own pace. Think about how you will fit the changes into your daily life.

Slips are common

Look for what caused the slip and think of positive ways to deal with it.

For example, if you blow your diet, don't be down on yourself. Try to figure out what was going on to make you eat poorly.

The important thing is to start over again, using what you learned from the slip to help you make changes in your plan. To keep on track, focus on making small changes.

Tip

Your diabetes educator can help you develop a plan.

Tell others about your plan

It is important to tell others about your plan for change and to ask them to support you.

Remember, you are making positive changes in your life. Pat yourself on the back for trying to change!

Review your plan often

Once you have a plan, it is important to review it on a regular basis to see how it is working and if it needs to be adjusted.

Our behavior change goals worksheet can help you set your goals and make plans to achieve them.


 

Source: Allina Health's Patient Education Department, Basic Skills for Living with Diabetes, fifth edition, ISBN 1-931876-32-0

First published: 12/01/2006
Last updated: 10/25/2011

Reviewed by: Allina Health's Patient Education Department experts