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Cortisone (Injection)

Cortisone (KOR-ti-sone)

Treats inflammation, certain types of arthritis, and many other medical problems. This medicine is a corticosteroid.

Brand Name(s):

There may be other brand names for this medicine.

When This Medicine Should Not Be Used:

You should not use this medicine if you have ever had an allergic reaction to cortisone. You should not use cortisone if you have a fungal infection.

How to Use This Medicine:

Injectable

  • Your doctor will prescribe your exact dose and tell you how often it should be given.
  • This medicine may be given into the buttocks, upper arm, thigh, or other large muscle. This is called an IM, or intramuscular (in-tra-MUSS-cue-lar) injection.

If a dose is missed:

  • This medicine needs to be given on a regular schedule. If you miss a dose, call your doctor for instructions.

How to Store and Dispose of This Medicine:

  • If you have your treatments at a clinic, the staff at the clinic will keep your medicine there.
  • If you have your treatments at home, you may need to store your medicine. Keep the medicine at room temperature, away from heat. Do not freeze.
  • Keep all medicine out of the reach of children.
  • If you have your treatments at home, you should be given a special container for the used needles. Keep it where children or pets cannot reach it.

Drugs and Foods to Avoid:

Ask your doctor or pharmacist before using any other medicine, including over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

  • Make sure your doctor knows if you are also taking insulin, diuretics (water pills), phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin®), rifampin, blood thinners (Coumadin®), or estrogen.
  • Talk to your doctor before getting flu shots or other vaccines while getting cortisone. Vaccines may not work as well while you are taking this medicine.

Warnings While Using This Medicine:

  • If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, talk with your doctor before using this medicine.
  • Before using cortisone, let your doctor know if you have liver or thyroid problems, diabetes, cataracts, glaucoma, or herpes simplex that affects your eyes.
  • Avoid getting this medicine in your eyes, nose, mouth, or on your skin.
  • It may be easier for you to get an infection while you are getting cortisone. Avoid crowds or people with colds, flu, or other infections.
  • If you are exposed to chicken pox or measles, tell your doctor right away.
  • Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are taking cortisone.

Possible Side Effects While Using This Medicine:

Call your doctor right away if you notice any of these side effects:

  • Black or tarry stools
  • Muscle weakness or cramps
  • Unexplained fever, sore throat

If you notice these less serious side effects, talk with your doctor:

  • Fluid retention, weight gain
  • Restlessness, anxiety, mood changes
  • Sweating
  • Redness of the face
  • Easy bruising, small purple spots on your skin
  • Thinning skin, acne
  • Increased hair growth
  • Irregular menstrual periods

If you notice other side effects that you think are caused by this medicine, tell your doctor

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088


Last Updated: 4/4/2014

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