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Glucagon (Injection)

Glucagon (GLOO-ka-gon)

Treats severe low blood sugar. Also may be used before X-rays.

Brand Name(s):

GlucaGen HypoKit, Glucagen, Glucagen Diagnostic Kit, Glucagon Emergency Kit

There may be other brand names for this medicine.

When This Medicine Should Not Be Used:

You should not use this medicine if you have had an allergic reaction to glucagon. You should not use glucagon if you have pheochromocytoma (adrenal gland tumors) unless directed to do so by your doctor.

How to Use This Medicine:

Injectable

  • Your doctor will tell you how much to take and how often.
  • Glucagon comes with a patient information sheet that explains how to use it. A family member or friend should be taught how to use glucagon before an emergency occurs. Ask your health caregiver any questions that you may have about preparing this medicine.
  • Before preparing the medicine, remove the flip-off seal and wipe the top of the bottle with an alcohol swab.
  • Remove the needle protector from the syringe. Inject the contents of the syringe into the bottle of medicine. Then remove the syringe.
  • Gently shake the bottle until the liquid is clear. Check the bottle for dark specks. If you see any, throw the medicine away and prepare a new bottle.
  • Using the same syringe, draw up the correct amount of medicine. Inject the medicine as directed by your doctor.
  • After injecting the dose, you should lie down on your side in case you feel like vomiting.
  • When you wake up and are able to swallow, eat a meal as instructed by your doctor.

If a dose is missed:

  • Glucagon is used only when you have severe low blood sugar, or if you are going to have an X-ray. It is not taken on a regular schedule.

How to Store and Dispose of This Medicine:

  • Glucagon powder may be stored at room temperature, away from heat and direct light. Once the liquid is added to dry powder, the mixture should be used right away. Check the expiration date on the bottle and replace the glucagon before the expiration date. You should not use glucagon after the expiration date.
  • Keep all medicine out of the reach of children.

Drugs and Foods to Avoid:

Ask your doctor or pharmacist before using any other medicine, including over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

  • Avoid drinking alcohol with this or any other medicine used to treat diabetes.

Warnings While Using This Medicine:

  • Talk with your doctor before using this medicine, if you are pregnant, breastfeeding, or have insulinoma (tumors of the pancreas).
  • Learn to recognize symptoms of low blood sugar which include sweating, feeling very hungry, fast heartbeat, vision changes, drowsiness, confusion, a headache that does not go away, chills, or vomiting.
  • Ask your doctor what you should do in case you have low blood sugar. You will need to control it quickly.

Possible Side Effects While Using This Medicine:

Call your doctor right away if you notice any of these side effects:

  • Skin rash or trouble breathing
  • Fainting

If you notice these less serious side effects, talk with your doctor:

  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Facial flushing

If you notice other side effects that you think are caused by this medicine, tell your doctor

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088


Last Updated: 4/4/2014

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