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Dexamethasone (Intraocular route)

Pronunciation:

dex-a-METH-a-sone

Brand Names:

  • Ozurdex

Dosage Forms:

  • Implant

Classifications:

Therapeutic—

Corticosteroid, Weak

Pharmacologic—

Adrenal Glucocorticoid

Uses of This Medicine:

Dexamethasone intravitreal implant is used to treat an eye disease called macular edema (swelling of the back of the eye). Macular edema occurs when a blood vessel in the eye is clogged. This causes vision changes that must be treated right away. Dexamethasone is a corticosteroid (steroid medicine) that helps reduce the swelling in the eye.

Dexamethasone intravitreal implant is also used to treat an eye disease called uveitis (swelling in the middle part of the eye).

This medicine is only administered by or under the supervision of your doctor.

Before Using This Medicine:

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies—

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Children—

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of dexamethasone implant in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Older adults—

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of dexamethasone implant in the elderly.

Pregnancy—

Pregnancy CategoryExplanation
All TrimestersCAnimal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR no animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate studies in pregnant women.

Breast-feeding—

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Other medicines—

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Artemether
  • Praziquantel
  • Rilpivirine
  • Rotavirus Vaccine, Live

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Aldesleukin
  • Axitinib
  • Boceprevir
  • Bosutinib
  • Bupropion
  • Carbamazepine
  • Clozapine
  • Cobicistat
  • Crizotinib
  • Dabrafenib
  • Darunavir
  • Dasatinib
  • Doxorubicin
  • Doxorubicin Hydrochloride Liposome
  • Efavirenz
  • Elvitegravir
  • Enzalutamide
  • Eslicarbazepine Acetate
  • Etravirine
  • Fosamprenavir
  • Hydrocodone
  • Imatinib
  • Ivabradine
  • Ixabepilone
  • Lapatinib
  • Mitotane
  • Nevirapine
  • Nifedipine
  • Nilotinib
  • Nimodipine
  • Piperaquine
  • Pixantrone
  • Primidone
  • Ritonavir
  • Rivaroxaban
  • Romidepsin
  • Simeprevir
  • Sunitinib
  • Telaprevir
  • Temsirolimus
  • Thalidomide
  • Ticagrelor
  • Vandetanib
  • Vincristine Sulfate
  • Vincristine Sulfate Liposome
  • Vortioxetine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Alatrofloxacin
  • Alcuronium
  • Aminoglutethimide
  • Aprepitant
  • Aspirin
  • Atracurium
  • Balofloxacin
  • Caspofungin
  • Cinoxacin
  • Ciprofloxacin
  • Clinafloxacin
  • Enoxacin
  • Fleroxacin
  • Fluindione
  • Flumequine
  • Fosaprepitant
  • Fosphenytoin
  • Gallamine
  • Gemifloxacin
  • Grepafloxacin
  • Hexafluorenium
  • Itraconazole
  • Levofloxacin
  • Licorice
  • Lomefloxacin
  • Metocurine
  • Moxifloxacin
  • Norfloxacin
  • Ofloxacin
  • Ospemifene
  • Pancuronium
  • Pefloxacin
  • Phenobarbital
  • Phenytoin
  • Prulifloxacin
  • Rifampin
  • Rifapentine
  • Rosoxacin
  • Rufloxacin
  • Saiboku-To
  • Sparfloxacin
  • Temafloxacin
  • Tosufloxacin
  • Trovafloxacin Mesylate
  • Vecuronium
  • Warfarin

Other interactions—

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other medical problems—

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Detached retina (eye disorder) or
  • Endophthalmitis (inflammation of the eye) or
  • Glaucoma (increased pressure in the eye) or
  • Herpes infection of the eye, history of—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Eye infection caused by a virus, fungus, or bacteria or
  • Eye lens problems (anterior chamber intraocular lens (ACIOL) or aphakia with torn eye lens) or
  • Glaucoma, advanced—Should not be used in patients with these conditions.

Proper Use of This Medicine:

This medicine is an implant that is placed in your eye. It will stay in your eye and does not need to be removed. An eye doctor will give you this medicine in a hospital or clinic setting.

Precautions While Using This Medicine:

Your eye doctor will want to check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks after you receive this medicine.

Serious eye problems may occur after receiving this medicine. Check with your eye doctor right away if you have a change in vision or the eye becomes red, sensitive to light, or painful. Also, tell your doctor if you feel increased pressure in the eye.

This medicine may cause temporary blurred vision. Avoid driving, using machines, or doing anything else that could be dangerous if you are not able to see well.

Side Effects of This Medicine:

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common
Bloody eye
blurred vision
change in vision
eye pain
loss of vision
redness of the white part of the eye or inside of the eyelid
Less common
Blindness
decreased vision
gradual loss of vision
headache
nausea
seeing a veil or curtain across part of your vision
seeing flashes or sparks of light
seeing floating spots before the eyes
vomiting

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.


Last Updated: 4/4/2014

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